Pineapple Sorbet Wallpaper Nursery (Hygge & West-Rifle Paper Co)

Part One: The Why

As a child I have a very vivid memory of what our house looked like.  Wallpaper in every room.  Wallpaper in the family room (cream with forest green grid on top).  Wallpaper in the kitchen (forest green with white polka dots…or small white flowers?).  Wallpaper border in one of the bedrooms (teddy bears, ducks with mauve bows, and hearts).  Wallpaper in my bedroom (rainbow gingham, but only up to chair rail hight).  Wallpaper in the bathroom, AND a wallpaper boarder.  The next vivid memory I have is the removal and for the next 10 years hearing my mother say, “I WILL NEVER WALLPAPER AGAIN!”  It left a lasting impression to say the least.

Every year at the parade of homes I see beautiful wallpapers in the models.  I look on Pinterest and see stunning wallpaper features in laundry rooms.  Several of my blog friends have done stunning wallpaper projects: Emily’s ostrich bathroom, Amber’s floral accent wall, Kelly’s floral closet, Katja’s textured entry, Anu’s modern entry (and way more that my pregnancy brain is struggling to remember).

And then I got sad.  I was sad because I was a wimp.  I loved all the wallpapers, but I was too afraid to commit.  I stuck with stenciled walls because I knew I could always paint over them… until I found this from Hygge & West, designed by Rifle Paper Co:

hygge and west pineapple sorbet wallpaper - riflepaperco

I showed a picture to Aaron and said, “What do you think about this for the nursery?”  I was still up in the air about it, but he was VERY insistent that we do it.  He reminded me that pineapples are the traditional way to say “welcome home” therefore making it the perfect place to bring home our new baby girl.

Since we already had a plethora of baby girl items leftover from Evelyn, we were able to splurge a little to get this wallpaper.

Who better to help me install this wallpaper than the queen of wallpaper herself, my mother!  I was worried she would talk me out of it, but she was very supportive!  She reminded me that as long as I don’t wallpaper the entire house, when we ARE ready to remove it, one wall won’t be that big of a deal.

Part Two: The How

**If you aren’t doing a wallpaper project, this part of the post will be pretty boring, since it is tips and tricks of the actual install.  Just enjoy the pictures!  If you ARE getting ready for a wallpaper project, I hope this helps you and can help you avoid some of the mistakes I feel like I made.**

Since I was doing the same brand of wallpaper as Amber from Wills Casa, I read and reread her tutorial over and over and found it very helpful.  I recommend you do the same if you’re planning on Hygge & West wallpaper.

Most wallpapers are pre-pasted, meaning you just have to get them wet, then stick it to the wall.  Not this paper.  It involves a special paste that you apply both to the paper and the wall.

These are the supplies we needed: 2 buckets (one for paste, one for water), the paste (which we purchased from Hygge & West as well), spreaders, razor blade, sponges, rollers.  Not pictured: plastic floor cover.

wallpaper-supplies

Make sure to mix your paste ahead of time, because it takes an hour to set up.  While it was swelling, we prepped the room with the drop cloth and towels because this is a MESSY process.

The first piece is the hardest to hang.  That’s what everyone will tell you.  You can’t count on walls being level, so need to get a level and measure then draw a “plumb line” straight down.  That is what you’ll line your wallpaper up with.  (Please see pictured my cute mama below!)

how-to-hang-hygge-and-west-wallpaper

When you’re applying paste to the back of the wallpaper, do it liberally.  You’ll also roll paste onto the wall.

how-to-hang-traditional-wallpaper

You’ll “book” the paper by folding it into thirds, and letting it sit for about 5-7 minutes.

wallpaper-how-to

You’ll line the paper up (to the pencil line if it’s your first piece- to the pattern if it’s any piece after that).  Make sure you cut your pieces long, because you’ll go back and trim it with a razor blade.  Once you have the paper in place, the real hard part happens: smoothing it out.  This is extremely messy.  You’ll have gooey paste oozing in every direction.  Don’t be afraid!  This is what you want.  It’s just difficult because the paper will start to wrinkle in places.

I found the best way to avoid wrinkles and creases is this method:  don’t start smoothing with the scrapers right away!  Loosely start smoothing the paper onto the wall with your hands, almost like you’re stretching the paper into place.  Start in the middle, then work your way to the edges.  THEN use your scrapers.  After I discovered this method I had far less wrinkles.

Use the sponge and washcloth to wipe off extra paste with warm water.  The wallpaper is very durable and strong.

We have slightly textured walls.  I went back and forth on deciding if we should do a skim coat to make the wall smooth, or leave the texture (knowing it would show through the wallpaper).  We decided to not cover the texture, because when we are done with the wallpaper, we don’t want to have to re-texture the wall to match the rest of the room.  However, I ended up being happy with this decision for another reason.  It hid any wrinkles that I was unable to smooth out.  And the texture is barely noticeable.

After each strip of wallpaper was smoothed into place, we held the edge of the scraper to the baseboards/ceiling, and ran the razor along the edge to trim it.

The most frustrating part of the project was the very last piece.  We had a gap of less than an inch that we had to fill.  It was pretty unbelievable.  We just trimmed the whole last piece down to about 4 inches, then after pasting it in place, cut it with the razor.

wallpaper-end

Part Three: The Finished Product 

Here’s the nursery before:

hygge-and-west-wallpaper-before

After about 5 hours of messy work later (and a sneak peek at the dresser I scored on a thrift hunt!):

pineapple-wallpaper-nursery-MCM-rifle-paper-co

I just need to give another huge shout out to my mom for helping me with this.  Wallpapering is definitely a two person job, and I couldn’t have done it without her.  We had such a great time talking and laughing while working on a project together.  It was a really special day to spend with her, and I’m happy that when I see this wall I can remember how much fun it was to create it with my mommy!

pineapple-sorbet-wallpaper-MCM-rifle-paper-co

There are 2 different seams in this picture, and you have to look really close to find them.  The pattern matched up almost perfectly, which I was surprised about because of the hand-painted nature of the pattern.

pineapple-wallpaper-nursery

This pineapple pattern is EVERYTHING.  I love the blush color of the flowers.  I love that it’s on a white background, and it’s the same shade of white as the other walls in the room.  It flows together really well.  I love how happy and cheerful it is.

Evelyn was adorable while I was trying to photograph the room.  She loved reaching for the pineapples and patting them.

wallpaper-finished

(Also, can you believe how curly her hair is?!)

nursery-wallpaper-pineapple

pineapple-nursery-wallpaper

We are very excited to welcome home our Tiny-girl, the pineapple of our eye.

 

 

 

Easy Gift Idea – Pizza Lover Tote

I think it’s a safe assumption that everyone has a pizza lover in their life.

I know I do!  My bae Heidi loves pizza more than any person in this world.  I asked her for her favorite pizza quote, and she provided me with, “Pizza is the only love triangle I want.”

Pizza-love-triangle-tote-gift

You could make this gift for ANYONE.  I would suggest snooping on their Pinterest boards for a quote or phrase they have pinned.

I’m joining up with my blog friends who are putting on a blog series called Dare to DIY.  Today’s theme is give handmade.  You can find more ideas over at Maybe Matilda.

dare to diy

After Heidi told me her favorite pizza quote, I designed it on picmonkey and printed it off.

pizza love triangleI very carefully cut out the letters with an xacto knife to make a stencil.  I realized this would be MUCH EASIER if I had a cutting machine.  Hopefully there’s one in my future, but right now, I’m going old school.

Pizza-is-the-only-love-triangle-i-want

pizza-is-the-only-love-triangle-tote

I centered the “stencil” on the tote, then taped it down.  I tried painters tape, but it wouldn’t stick to the bag.  So I used duct tape.  I taped down the middles of the letter for the stencil.

DIY-easy-gift-pizza-is-the-only-love-triangle-i-want

I mixed acrylic paint with textile medium to make fabric paint.

textile-medium-fabric-paint

I used a stipple sponge brush to paint the tote bag.

Easy-gift-idea-DIY-pizza-is-the-only-love-triangle-tote-bag

Unfortunately, the middle of the letters on “Love Triangle” lifted up, so those got filled all the way in.

DIY-gift-idea-pizza-tote-bag

I free-handed a slice of pizza at the top of the tote.  In general, I was a little disappointed how the paint bled a little.  I was hoping for crisper lines.  But I guess I’m not surprised after using a piece of paper as a stencil.

I still think the bag is still pretty rad.  I think it works since the font I used already had a ‘handwritten quality’ about it, so the bleeds just kind of added to that.  I’m pretty excited to send it off and check something off my Christmas gift list!

Pizza-is-the-only-love-triangle-i-want-tote-gift-bag

 

 

How To Paint A Vintage Trailer

It’s the post you’ve been waiting for.

I’m not going to clog it up with words.  Just the facts.

 

To tape off the windows and lights, I used painters tape meant for stucco.

How to paint a vintage trailer

 

How to paint a vintage trailer

I bought this automotive paint sprayer for $60 from Harbor Freight.  Normally I don’t do HF tools.  But I didn’t want to over-spend on this tool in case I never used it again.  Turns out I LOVE it and have since painted several more things not auto related.

How to paint a vintage trailer

 

Use oil based exterior paint with enamel.  Thin with acetone according to the directions on the back of the paint can.

I used RustOleum’s Aluminum for the silver.  Unfortunately RustOleum doesn’t make tintable oil based exterior paint, so I hit up Sherwin-Williams to mix up some Nifty Turquoise for me.

I tested them on a spare piece of corrugate metal to make sure I liked the way they looked.

How to paint a vintage trailer

I sprayed starting at the top.  The technique is similar to spray painting.  Lots of light coats or else drips will happen.

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

I taped off where I wanted the stripe to be.  I did NOT use the stucco tape.  I used auto-paint masking tape.  I noticed there was some slight over-spray from the aluminum.  I knew that when I painted the teal that I’d have to be extra careful.  I waited for the aluminum to dry and taped some plastic to the stripe to protect it from overspray.  It worked great.  Unfortunately, I did not take a picture.

Make sure to cover up.  I was the tin man.  And oil based paint does NOT come off easily.  I literally had to bathe in acetone and pumice to clean up.  It was the most painful bath of my life.

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

Then we had the joy of removing the tape.  Be prepared.  The stucco tape is STICKY.  Like, really really really sticky.  But nothing bled through at all.

How to paint a vintage trailer

We took the trailer camping over Easter weekend.  Last minute we needed to put the Xterra in the shop, but luckily we were able to use Aaron’s brother’s car to pull it.  She was STUNNING in the trailer park.

How to paint a vintage trailer

There are still more updates we plan on doing to the exterior.  Hub caps, new light covers, paint the trim around the windows.  But the paint scheme is settled!  Originally I wanted something a little more feminine, like scallops.  But Aaron and I decided something classic to the era would be best.  And he was right.

This wasn’t an ideal “after” picture because of the way the sun is shining, but I’m so in love with how shiny the RustOleum Aluminum is.  It looks so classic.

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

This has been the funnest project.  It has been hard work.  I did most of the painting by myself in the hot sun (as my sunburned neck testifies of).  The reward is great!  We had so much family-fun this weekend.

Waking up with my two loves in the canned ham on Easter was pure joy.

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

I even made Rice Crispy treats :)

How to paint a vintage trailer

 

And most importantly, she has a name.  Welcome to the family, Myrtle.

How to paint a vintage trailer