Up-Cycled Vanity Light Fixture

If you’re late to the show, I painted my bathroom vanity.  And that made me viciously tear down some wall paper and re-tile my shower.  Natural cause and effect brings us to today.

A new bathroom vanity light fixture.

bathroom vanity light

We have absolutely no natural light in our bathroom.  As ugly as this fixture was, I really liked that it was a 6-bulb.  But new 6-bulbed light fixtures are really expensive.

Good thing the classified ad gods smile upon us.

I was able to pick up this dime for a few dollars.

bathroom vanity light

I liked the shiny chrome and brass look.  HATED the frosted glass.  I splurged by buying new shade covers from Lowe’s.  (I tried to find them on their website so I could share the link, but could not.)  They were around $9 a piece if I remember right.  That makes the whole fixture less than $100, which is a steal, if you ask me.

bathroom vanity light

I’m going to take this moment to toot my own horn.  I wired and hung that light all by myself while Aaron was at work!

bathroom vanity light

I hate this picture because I had to use the flash.  But it was the only way I could really capture the essence of the fixture.

bathroom vanity light

And that, my friends, is how you work the system when you need a newer prettier light fixture.

 

Anonymous Gray Painted Bathroom Vanity

Sometimes you live with something really ugly.

And it’s so ugly, that you ignore it.

You almost forget what it is, because you see the ugly every day.

But it doesn’t change what IT is.

This is my “it.”

Painted Bathroom Vanity

Meet the vanity of our bathroom.  Someone once did one coat (NO PRIMER) of paint over wood cabinets, and left it.  And we moved in with intentions to change it, and accidentally left it.  Sometimes renovating a kitchen gets in the way.  Maybe having a baby does too.

Then one day, you break.  So long, Uggo.

HOME_TOUR_BATHROOM

I took off all the doors with haste.

When I see this picture, I CRINGE knowing that I left it like this for 2.5 years.  This should have been the first thing I fixed.  I’m counting on my internet friends to slap me next time I make a poor judgement call.

Painted Bathroom Vanity

Meet your death, cream puff.

Gray Bathroom Cabinets

I don’t have hostility.  Just determination.

Gray Bathroom Cabinets

I used Sherwin-Williams Anonymous Gray.  It was a nice dark warm gray to cover up the rotten milk color.

Gray Bathroom Cabinets

And suddenly, it wasn’t ugly anymore.

Gray Bathroom Cabinets

 

And if you give a blogger a paint brush… she’ll redo the whole room.

Gray Bathroom Cabinets

 

More on this can of worms next time.

HOME_TOUR_BATHROOM

 

How To Paint A Vintage Trailer

It’s the post you’ve been waiting for.

I’m not going to clog it up with words.  Just the facts.

 

To tape off the windows and lights, I used painters tape meant for stucco.

How to paint a vintage trailer

 

How to paint a vintage trailer

I bought this automotive paint sprayer for $60 from Harbor Freight.  Normally I don’t do HF tools.  But I didn’t want to over-spend on this tool in case I never used it again.  Turns out I LOVE it and have since painted several more things not auto related.

How to paint a vintage trailer

 

Use oil based exterior paint with enamel.  Thin with acetone according to the directions on the back of the paint can.

I used RustOleum’s Aluminum for the silver.  Unfortunately RustOleum doesn’t make tintable oil based exterior paint, so I hit up Sherwin-Williams to mix up some Nifty Turquoise for me.

I tested them on a spare piece of corrugate metal to make sure I liked the way they looked.

How to paint a vintage trailer

I sprayed starting at the top.  The technique is similar to spray painting.  Lots of light coats or else drips will happen.

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

I taped off where I wanted the stripe to be.  I did NOT use the stucco tape.  I used auto-paint masking tape.  I noticed there was some slight over-spray from the aluminum.  I knew that when I painted the teal that I’d have to be extra careful.  I waited for the aluminum to dry and taped some plastic to the stripe to protect it from overspray.  It worked great.  Unfortunately, I did not take a picture.

Make sure to cover up.  I was the tin man.  And oil based paint does NOT come off easily.  I literally had to bathe in acetone and pumice to clean up.  It was the most painful bath of my life.

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

Then we had the joy of removing the tape.  Be prepared.  The stucco tape is STICKY.  Like, really really really sticky.  But nothing bled through at all.

How to paint a vintage trailer

We took the trailer camping over Easter weekend.  Last minute we needed to put the Xterra in the shop, but luckily we were able to use Aaron’s brother’s car to pull it.  She was STUNNING in the trailer park.

How to paint a vintage trailer

There are still more updates we plan on doing to the exterior.  Hub caps, new light covers, paint the trim around the windows.  But the paint scheme is settled!  Originally I wanted something a little more feminine, like scallops.  But Aaron and I decided something classic to the era would be best.  And he was right.

This wasn’t an ideal “after” picture because of the way the sun is shining, but I’m so in love with how shiny the RustOleum Aluminum is.  It looks so classic.

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

This has been the funnest project.  It has been hard work.  I did most of the painting by myself in the hot sun (as my sunburned neck testifies of).  The reward is great!  We had so much family-fun this weekend.

Waking up with my two loves in the canned ham on Easter was pure joy.

How to paint a vintage trailer

How to paint a vintage trailer

I even made Rice Crispy treats :)

How to paint a vintage trailer

 

And most importantly, she has a name.  Welcome to the family, Myrtle.

How to paint a vintage trailer

 

 

 

Got Milk {Paint}?

White Grandfather Clock makeover - Milk Paint Review

Yesterday I was being all whiny about Milk Paint.  It’s a hard life.

I am no stranger at painting furniture.  I’ve even BS-ed mastered the art of no-sand painting.  But I needed to test this much-talked-about heavy-hailed Milk Paint.  Let’s take this Milk Paint for a drive.  This post is my unsponsored, uncensored, untarnished review of said product.

First of all, what is milk paint?  According to Miss Mustard Seed:

Milk Paint is an ancient all-natural paint containing basic ingredients including milk protein (casein), limestone, clay and natural pigments.  It is environmentally friendly, non-toxic and contains no VOCs.

Milk Paint can either provide a solid coat of paint, or an authentic chippy look.  If you want a solid coat, you will need to use the bonding agent.  For the chippy look, you are good to go.  No priming or sanding is needed.

Milk Paint comes in a powder form.  I joked that my bag of snow came in the mail.  No one thought that was funny.  Apparently mail-order drugs are no laughing matter.

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My Milk Paint Brings All The Boys To The Yard

Milk Paint Trial

The past two days have been a hurricane of love!  Young House Love, more like.  In case you missed it, my painted headboard was featured over on the Celestial Kingdom of blogs.  To all my new visitors & readers: Word up.  I like you, and I want to be friends.  So drop a line,  keep it real, and tell me the latest gossip.

I’ve been dabbling in Miss Mustard Seed’s milk paint through the night.  (Remember grandfa-fazza from Thrifty Thursday a skip ago?)

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